Monday, February 28, 2011

Virginia Water Radio 55: Week of Feb. 28, 2011

From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio (Episode 55), for the week of February 28, 2011.
Audio archived 5-7-12; please contact Virginia Water Radio for access to audio file (length 8:56).

NEWS

  • A path forward appears to be in place for a 50-year water-supply plan for Charlottesville and Albemarle County. On February 22, the Charlottesville City Council voted to construct a new earthen dam on the Ragged Mountain Reservoir, raising the reservoir height by 30 feet at first, with the potential for an ultimate 42-foot rise. This reversed the City’s decision last September to repair and raise the existing concrete Ragged Mountain dam, and it put the Council close to the position of the Albemarle County Board of Supervisors. Later that week, the Albemarle board agreed to a 30-foot, first-phase increase, and the Rivanna Water and Sewer Authority said it would seek a state-permit modification to allow this phased plan. News sources: A split city council endorses earthen dam for water supply plan, Charlottesville Daily Progress, 2/23/11; County accepts initial 30-foot pool rise for dam, Charlottesville Daily Progress, 2/26/11; and Water authority approves next steps for earthen dam's construction, Charlottesville Daily Progress, 2/25/11.
  • In mid-February, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries staff did their first trout stocking in South Holston Lake, as part of a joint management agreement between Virginia and Tennessee. The lake is a 7,600-acre reservoir on the South Holston River, with 1600 acres in Washington County, Virginia, and 6000 acres in Tennessee. The two states’ agreement, which took effect on July 1, 2010, also includes coordination of rules on catch limits, and the availability of a special permit to allow fishing on the lake in both states.  News source: Virginia Now Stocking Trout in South Holston Lake, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries Outdoor Report, 2/23/11.
Now, here’s a lightning-fast look at several recent stories, all about legislative action affecting the Chesapeake Bay.
  • The House of Representatives’ spending bill for the rest of Fiscal Year 2011, which the House passed on February 19 and sent to the Senate, includes Virginia Rep. Robert Goodlatte’s amendment to prohibit any spending during this fiscal year by the U.S. EPA on the Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load, or TMDL.  News Source: Bay 'diet' funding cut by House, Baltimore Sun, 2/19/11.
  • The House spending bill also would reduce from $50 million to $40 million the current year’s funding for the EPA’s Chesapeake Bay Program, and would reduce from $2.1 billion to $690 million the Clean Water State Revolving Loan Fund, which provides loans for wastewater-treatment projects. News Source: House votes to block Bay TMDL, other environmental programs, Bay Journal, 2/22/11.
  • And the General Assembly also passed bills that prohibit the sale in Virginia of lawn-maintenance fertilizer containing phosphorus, and the sale of de-icing products containing urea, nitrogen, or phosphorus. The bills also require golf courses to have nutrient-management plans. News Source:General Assembly passes bill aimed at reducing Chesapeake Bay pollution, Associated Press, 2/19/11; and the Virginia Legislative Information System at http://leg1.state.va.us/, 3/1/11 (the bills are HB 1831 and SB 1055).
And in our last news item this week:
  • The Virginia Institute of Marine Science (or VIMS) has received a $1.75 million grant to study scallop populations in four areas from the Delmarva Peninsula to southern New England. The survey will be used to determine whether current catch limits are appropriate. An unusually large harvest off New York State in 2010 has raised the question of whether populations might be larger than previously thought and consequently might support increased catch limits. The VIMS grant comes from the Sea Scallop Research Set-Aside Awards, which the scallop industry funds and the National Marine Fisheries Service administers. Scallop harvests by Virginia-based vessels have been worth more than $60 million annually since 2007, making scallops Virginia’s single most valuable fishery species. News source: VIMS research helps sustain Virginia’s most valuable fishery, Virginia Institute of Marine Science news release, 2/21/11.
WATER SOUNDS AND MUSIC

This week we feature a selection from a Virginia-based band that takes its name from the 3rd-highest mountain in the Commonwealth: “Banks of New River,” performed by the Whitetop Mountain Band on their 2008 album, “Bull Plus 10%,” from Arhoolie Records. The melancholy lover in this song sits beside the New River, a well-known landmark of Southwest Virginia. Situated near the Eastern Continental Divide, the northward-flowing New distinguishes itself from many other Virginia rivers that flow south toward the Atlantic Coast. The 320-mile long river starts as two streams in North Carolina and continues its journey through Virginia. After joining the Kanawha River in West Virginia, water from the New River continues northward and westward to empty into the Ohio River, then the Mississippi, and finally the Gulf of Mexico. Information on the New River and Whitetop Mountain was taken from the following sources: Frits Van der Leeden, The Environmental Almanac of Virginia (1998), from Tennyson Press, Lexington, Virginia; K.P. Sevebeck, et al., Virginia’s Waters (1986), Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Blacksburg, Virginia; and Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, “New River,” accessed at http://www.dgif.virginia.gov/fishing/waterbodies/display.asp?id=163, 2/24/11. More information about the Whitetop Mountain Band is available from their website: http://whitetopmountainband.tripod.com/index.html. Information about the watersheds into which the New River flows is available from the U.S. EPA’s Surf Your Watershed Web site at http://cfpub.epa.gov/surf/locate/index.cfm.

UPCOMING MEETINGS AND EVENTS

First, in Virginia government policy and regulatory meetings, occurring between March 3 and 9.
  • On March 7 at 3 p.m., the Biscuit Run State Park Master Plan Advisory Committee meets at the Albemarle County Social Services Building in Charlottesville. The Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation has land in Albemarle County that will eventually become Biscuit Run State Park. For more information about the meeting: Janit Llewellyn at (804) 786-0887 or janit.llewellyn@dcr.virginia.gov.  

  • On March 9 at 10:00 a.m., the Stormwater Management Program Regulations Advisory Panel meets at the Patrick Henry Building in Richmond. The Stormwater Management Regulations Advisory Panel is advising the Soil and Water Conservation Board in considering amendments to Virginia Stormwater Management Program Permit Regulations (4 VAC 50-60 in the Virginia Administrative Code.) More information and relevant documents about the proposed stormwater changes are available online at http://www.townhall.state.va.us/L/viewchapter.cfm?chapterid=1145. For more information: David Dowling, (804) 786-2291 or david.dowling@dcr.virginia.gov.
Next, here are three meetings about Total Maximum Daily Loads, or TMDLs, for impaired waters:


Finally, in educational and recreational events:

Virginia Water Radio is a product of the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, which is solely responsible for the show’s content. Hosting and bandwidth for this podcast are also provided by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center. We invite you to visit the center online at www.vwrrc.vt.edu.

Show notes and production assistance were provided by Patrick Fay. Emily Whitesell wrote this week’s Water Sounds and Music segment. Recording assistance was provided by the Office of University Relations at Virginia Tech.

Opinions expressed on this show are not necessarily those of the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Tech, or our broadcasting stations.

If you need more information about anything mentioned this week, call us at (540) 231-5463, or visit our web site at www.virginiawaterradio.org.

Monday, February 21, 2011

Virginia Water Radio 54: Week of Feb. 21, 2011

From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio (Episode 54), for the week of February 21, 2011.
Click to Listen to Episode (Length: 00:07:46)

NEWS
  • If you haven’t been hearing rainfall on the roof lately, you’re not alone. In most of Virginia, precipitation between December 20 and February 17 was only about 25 to 50 percent of normal, according to the Southeast Regional Climate Center. This has led to over 98 percent of Virginia being classified as abnormally dry, with two-thirds of the state in a moderate drought, according to the February 15 U.S. Drought Monitor. The dry conditions call for even closer-than-usual attention to Virginia’s spring wildfire season, which started unofficially with a number of fires around the state due to high winds during the weekend before Valentine’s Day. During the official spring wildfire season from February 15 to April 30, the Commonwealth’s 4 p.m. Burning Law is in effect, prohibiting burning before 4 p.m. “if the fire is in, or within 300 feet of, woodland, brushland, or fields containing dry grass or other flammable materials.” News sources: U.S. Drought Monitor for 2/15/11, at http://drought.unl.edu/dm, 2/18/1; Southeast Regional Climate Center, 60-day precipitation map at http://www.sercc.com/climateinfo/precip_maps, 2/18/11; Virginia Department of Forestry Web site, http://www.dof.virginia.gov/index.shtml, 2/18/11; Winds Increase Wildfires Around Virginia, Associated Press, 2/15/11; High Winds Spark Brush Fires, Down Trees, Newsplex.com, 2/14/11.
Now, here’s a lightning-fast look at several recent stories:
  • The Bedford County Public Service Authority plans to seek a state permit to increase its allowable daily Smith Mountain Lake water withdrawal from 2 million gallons to 12 million gallons in order to serve potential growth areas in Bedford and Franklin counties, provide additional supply during drought, and replace two million gallons per day currently purchased from Lynchburg. 
  • On March 3 in Louisa, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission will hear arguments in the challenge by the Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League to Dominion Virginia Power’s application for a “combined license” permit to build and operate a third nuclear reactor at the North Anna Nuclear Power Station. 
  • The Eskimo Hill landfill in Stafford County—which in 2009 recycled 45.4 percent of material entering the facility, one of the highest rates in Virginia—is implementing a program to recycle wastewater-treatment sludge into home-garden compost. 
And in our last news item this week:
  • Here’s a quick weather quiz. When and where in Virginia have tornadoes occurred? The answer: every month of the year and all parts of the state. According to Virginia Department of Emergency Management, or VDEM, 62 tornadoes struck the Commonwealth between 2008 and 2010, injuring over 200 people. That’s why March 15 is Tornado Preparedness Day in Virginia. At 9:45 a.m., a statewide tornado drill will be held to give schools, businesses, and citizens a chance to practice tornado-emergency plans. As of February 3, over half a million Virginians had registered to participate in this year’s drill, which YOU can, too, by going to the VDEM Web site at www.vaemergency.com. The statewide tornado drill is a joint effort between VDEM and the National Weather Service. News sources: Plan to hold tornado drill March 15, Virginia Department of Emergency Management News Release, 2/3/11; and VDEM Web page for tornadoes, 2/18/11.

WATER SOUNDS AND MUSIC

This week we feature another mystery sound: Southern Leopard Frog

if you guessed correctly a Southern Leopard Frog, you might want to consider volunteering for the Virginia Frog and Toad Calling Survey, part of the North American Amphibian Monitoring Program. The frog-calling survey collects data on populations of amphibians, whose permeable skin and life cycle tied to water make them highly sensitive to the environment and good indicators of water quality. Volunteer surveyors and other frog fans in Tidewater—the part of Virginia where this species is found—should soon hear the mating call of the Southern Leopard Frog, because it typically breeds in the winter and early spring. Thanks to the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries and to Lang Elliott of NatureSound Studio for permission to use this recording from the 2008 CD, “The Calls of Virginia Frogs and Toads.” Information on the Southern Leopard Frog was taken from Amphibians and Reptiles of the Carolinas and Virginia, by Bernard S. Martof et al. (Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 1980) and the Virginia Herpetological Society’s Web Site. Information on the Virginia Frog and Toad Calling Survey was taken from The Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries’ Web site at http://www.dgif.virginia.gov/wildlife/frogsurvey/.

UPCOMING MEETINGS AND EVENTS

First, in Virginia government policy and regulatory meetings, occurring between February 24 and March 2.
  • On January 21 at 10:00 a.m., the Stormwater Management Program Regulations Advisory Panel meets at the Patrick Henry Building in Richmond. The Stormwater Management Regulations Advisory Panel is advising the Soil and Water Conservation Board in considering amendments to Virginia Stormwater Management Program Permit Regulations (4 VAC 50-60 in the Virginia Administrative Code.) More information and relevant documents about the proposed stormwater changes are available online at http://www.townhall.state.va.us/L/viewchapter.cfm?chapterid=1145. For more information: David Dowling, (804) 786-2291 or david.dowling@dcr.virginia.gov.
During this period, there is one meeting about Total Maximum Daily Loads, or TMDLs, for impaired waters:
  • March 1, 10 a.m., at the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality office in Woodbridge, on the TMDL study for bacteria impairments of 15 Potomac River tributaries in Arlington, Fairfax, Fauquier, Loudoun, Prince William, and Stafford counties. For more information: Jennifer Carlson, (703) 583-3859 or Jennifer.Carlson@deq.virginia.gov.
Finally, in educational and recreational events:
  • On February 26, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Fauquier County High School in Warrenton, the Rapidan Chapter of Trout Unlimited is having its annual fishing show. The event is a fundraiser for the chapter’s restoration and educational projects, including the popular Trout in the Classroom program.

Virginia Water Radio is a product of the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, which is solely responsible for the show’s content. Hosting and bandwidth for this podcast are also provided by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center. We invite you to visit the center online at www.vwrrc.vt.edu.

Show notes and production assistance were provided by Patrick Fay. Emily Whitesell wrote this week’s Water Sounds and Music segment. Recording assistance was provided by the Office of University Relations at Virginia Tech.

Opinions expressed on this show are not necessarily those of the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Tech, or our broadcasting stations.

If you need more information about anything mentioned this week, call us at (540) 231-5463, or visit our web site at www.virginiawaterradio.org.

Monday, February 14, 2011

Virginia Water Radio 53: Week of Feb. 14, 2011

From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio (Episode 53), for the week of February 14, 2011.
Click to Listen to Episode (Length: 00:08:20)

NEWS
  • A proposed uranium mining and milling operation in Pittsylvania County has been back in the news lately. On February 1, the City of Virginia Beach released its study of the potential impacts on the city’s drinking water supplies if the proposed mine were to be flooded. According to a news release from the city, the “impacts to the drinking water supplies would be significant but not permanent after a worst-case storm.” Meanwhile, on February 7 in Richmond, about 200 people attended a public-comment meeting held by the National Research Council’s committee studying the potential health and environmental impacts of the proposed uranium operation. The Richmond hearing was the fourth by the committee, with future ones to take place in Denver in March and Saskatoon, Canada, in June. The committee’s report is expected in December. For the mine to proceed, the Virginia General Assembly would have to overturn a moratorium on uranium mining in the Commonwealth.  News sources: Virginia Beach Releases Results of Uranium Mining Study, City of Virginia Beach news release, 2/1/11; Beach study warns of risk if uranium mine floods, Virginian-Pilot, 2/2/11; Panel weighs lifting ban on uranium mining in Virginia, Virginian-Pilot, 2/8/11; and Uranium debate heats up in Richmond, Danville Register & Bee, 2/9/11. The Web site for the National Research Council study is http://www8.nationalacademies.org/cp/projectview.aspx?key=49253.
  • From the Virginia General Assembly: Senate Bill 1190, sponsored by Sen. Thomas Norment from Williamsburg, would expand the Virginia "Right to Farm Act" to include aquaculture. Some York County elected officials and residents are opposed to the bill, claiming that it would infringe on local land-use prerogatives and allow processing facilities that could reduce nearby residential property values. After an amendment to apply the law only to piers from land already zoned for agriculture, the bill passed the Senate on February 8 and moved to the House of Delegates. News sources: Feud over oyster farm turns into hot-button issue, Virginian-Pilot, 1/28/11; and Modified 'oyster bill' advances over York objections, Virginian-Pilot, 2/8/11. Senator Norment is a Republican from the 3rd Senatorial district.

And finally, here’s a lightning-fast look at other recent stories:
  • The Chesapeake Bay Foundation is using a National Fish and Wildlife Foundation grant to work with Shenandoah Valley farmers to fence cattle out of streams in three Valley watersheds.
  • On February 1, Governor Robert McDonnell told coal-industry executives that Virginia is considering whether or not to intervene in a lawsuit by West Virginia against U.S. EPA policies on depositing material from mountaintop mining into streams, a practice known as “valley fills.”
  • Also on February 1, the State Corporation Commission heard Northern Virginia Electric Cooperative’s permit request for a proposed 50-megawatt, $175-million power plant in South Boston that would use waste wood for fuel.

WATER SOUNDS AND MUSIC

This week’s selection provides a gentle reminder of the upcoming tax season, as this song was composed in honor of Virginia’s Non-Game Wildlife Tax Check-off: “Little Brown Bats Eating Mosquitos,” performed by Timothy Seaman on his 2004 CD “Virginia Wildlife,” from Pine Wind Music. In addition to the tax deadline, spring also marks another ominous event: the return of mosquitoes. These insects breed in a wide variety of still-water habitats. Their biting habit is annoying and spreads disease, but on the positive side, mosquitoes provide food for other aquatic insects, fish, birds, and—as reflected in the title of this song—bats. Contributions by Virginia taxpayers through the Non-Game Wildlife Tax Check-off help protect the habitats of many non-game animals, including Little Brown Bats. Mr. Seaman did the “Virginia Wildlife” CD in collaboration with the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries to celebrate Virginia’s natural resources and support non-game wildlife programs. For more information about the CD, visit https://www3.dgif.virginia.gov/estore/proddetail.asp?prod=VW219. Information about mosquitoes was taken from “Mosquitoes and Water,” in Virginia Water Central, June 2009, available online at www.vwrrc.vt.edu/watercentral.html. Information about voluntary contributions for Virginia taxpayers through various check-offs is available from the Virginia Department of Taxation at http://www.tax.virginia.gov/site.cfm?alias=voluntarycontributions.

UPCOMING MEETINGS AND EVENTS

First, in Virginia government policy and regulatory meetings, occurring between February 17 and February 23.
  • On February 17, at 1 p.m. at the Department of Environmental Quality, or DEQ, regional office in Glen Allen, is a meeting of the State Water Control Board’s Technical Advisory Committee on the general permit for nitrogen and phosphorus discharges and for nutrient trading in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. For more information: George Cosby at (804) 698-4067 or george.cosby@deq.virginia.gov. The committee is assisting the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality on reissuance and possible amendment of 9 VAC 25-820. The Notice of Intended Regulatory Action appeared in the Virginia Register of Regulations on September 14, 2009.   
  • Also on February 17, at 7 p.m. at Louisa County Middle School in Mineral, the State Water Control Board holds a public hearing on a draft permit for surface water impacts in King William and Louisa counties from construction of a proposed new reactor at Dominion Power’s North Anna Nuclear Power Station. For more information: Sarah Marsala, (703) 583-3898 or sarah.marsala@deq.virginia.gov.
Now, here are two meetings about Total Maximum Daily Loads, or TMDLs, for impaired waters:
  • February 17, 6:30 p.m. at the DEQ office in Virginia Beach, on the TMDL study for dissolved-oxygen-impaired sections of the Northwest River watershed in Virginia Beach and Chesapeake.
    For more information: Jennifer Howell, (757) 518-2111 or Jennifer.Howell@deq.virginia.gov

  • February 23, 7 p.m. at Northampton County Middle School in Machipongo, on the TMDL implementation plan for bacteria-impaired sections of the Kings Creek watershed in Northampton County. For more information: Jennifer Howell, (757) 518-2111 or jshowell@deq.virginia.gov.
Finally, in educational and recreational events:

Virginia Water Radio is a product of the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, which is solely responsible for the show’s content. Hosting and bandwidth for this podcast are also provided by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center. We invite you to visit the center online at www.vwrrc.vt.edu.

Show notes and production assistance were provided by Patrick Fay. Emily Whitesell wrote this week’s Water Sounds and Music segment. Recording assistance was provided by the Office of University Relations at Virginia Tech.

Opinions expressed on this show are not necessarily those of the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Tech, or our broadcasting stations.

If you need more information about anything mentioned this week, call us at (540) 231-5463, or visit our web site at www.virginiawaterradio.org.

Monday, February 7, 2011

Virginia Water Radio 52: Week of Feb. 7, 2011

From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio (Episode 52), for the week of February 7, 2011.

Audio archived 1-23-12; please contact Virginia Water Radio for access to audio file (length = 8:43).


NEWS
  • In January, the U.S. EPA announced that in winter 2011 it will conduct a second round of inspections of water-pollution-prevention practices on Shenandoah Valley farms. The agency inspected seven farms in 2010 as part of its focus on agricultural operations in the Valley, Delmarva Peninsula, and Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. The 2010 inspections focused on large confined-animal operations permitted under the Virginia Pollution Abatement program; the 2011 inspections are expected to focus more on smaller, unpermitted operations, according to Gary Flory of the Valley Regional Office of the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, or DEQ. As in 2010, DEQ staff will accompany EPA inspectors as observers to understand better the specific issues and practices on which the EPA is focused.  News source: EPA to inspect more farms in Valley, Lancaster Farming, 1/22/11.
And the last news item this week is our monthly water status report.
  • First, in precipitation. Here are National Weather Service preliminary rainfall totals for January 2010 at six Virginia locations: Norfolk, 3.6 inches, or 0.3 inches below normal; Richmond, 2.5 inches, or 1.1 below normal; Dulles Airport, 1.9 inches, or 1.2 below normal; Bristol, 1.9 inches, or 1.6 below normal; Roanoke, 0.8 inches, or 2.4 below normal; and Danville, 1.2 inches, or 2.8 below normal.
  • Second, in stream flow: According to the U.S. Geological Survey’s WaterWatch, streamflows averaged over the month of January were below normal or much below normal at about 91 percent of gages in Virginia or just beyond the state border. Flows were in the normal range at about 9 percent of stream gages, mostly in far southwestern Virginia.
  • And third, our drought watch: The weekly National Drought Monitor on February 1 showed abnormally dry or worse conditions in about 82 percent of Virginia, and moderate drought in about 55 percent of the state, a significant deterioration since December.

    News sources: Precipitation: Climate pages of the following National Weather Service offices: Blacksburg; Morristown, Tenn. (covers the Tri-Cities area near Bristol, Va.-Tenn.); Washington-Dulles; and Wakefield. Streamflow: U.S. Geological Survey WaterWatch for Virginia. Drought: The National Drought Monitor map from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.


WATER SOUNDS AND MUSIC

This week we feature another mystery sound: The Highlander Polar Plunge

Why did about 225 people gather on January 29 to jump into the 34-degree New River? They were all participants in the Highlander Polar Plunge, held in Radford to raise money for Special Olympics of the New River Valley. The charity received approximately $17,000 from the entry fee and from donations raised by the many plunging participants. Other plunges for Special Olympics are taking place in February throughout the country, including at several Virginia locations.  For more information on the 2011 Highlander Polar Plunger, see this Radford University news release or this Roanoke Times article. The Web site for Special Olympics is http://www.specialolympics.org/, and the Web site for Special Olympics Polar Plunges in Virginia is http://www.firstgiving.com/polarplungeva.
UPCOMING MEETINGS AND EVENTS

First, in Virginia government policy and regulatory meetings, occurring between February 10 and February 16.
  • On February 11, the Shenandoah Valley Poultry Litter-to-Energy Watershed and Air Advisory Group meets in Charlottesville.  The Shenandoah Valley Poultry Litter-to-Energy Watershed and Air Advisory Group advisory group has been established by the Virginia Departments of Environmental Quality and of Conservation and Recreation to assist in developing a scope of study to evaluate a large-scale poultry litter-to-energy project, which could help Virginia meet the Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load/Watershed Implementation Plan requirements and the Commonwealth’s renewable energy goals. For more information: Rick Weeks, rick.weeks@deq.virginia.gov or (804) 698-4020.
  • On February 15, the Virginia Gas and Oil Board meets in Lebanon. For more information: David Asbury, david.asbury@dmme.virginia.gov or (276)415-9700.
During this period, there are NO meetings about Total Maximum Daily Loads, or TMDLs, for impaired waters:

Finally, in educational and recreational events:
  • On February 19, at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia Cooperative Extension is holding the 8th Annual Landowners' Woods and Wildlife Conference. The conference will help owners of large or small woodland tracts learn about their natural resources and potential management tools. For more information, Adam Downing at (540) 948-6881.

Virginia Water Radio is a product of the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, which is solely responsible for the show’s content. Hosting and bandwidth for this podcast are also provided by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center. We invite you to visit the center online at www.vwrrc.vt.edu.

Show notes and production assistance were provided by Patrick Fay. Emily Whitesell helped write this week’s show. Recording assistance was provided by the Office of University Relations at Virginia Tech.

Opinions expressed on this show are not necessarily those of the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, Virginia Tech, or our broadcasting stations.

If you need more information about anything mentioned this week, call us at (540) 231-5463, or visit our web site at www.virginiawaterradio.org.