Monday, March 26, 2012

Episode 104 (3-26-12): "The Cumberland and the Merrimac," by Tom Roush


Please see below (after the transcript and show notes) for links to news and upcoming events.

TRANSCRIPT 


From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of March 26, 2012.

This week we feature another song in the theme of the role of waterways in the American Revolutionary and Civil Wars.  Have a listen for about a minute.

MUSIC 

You’ve been listening to part of “The Cumberland and the Merrimac,” performed by Tom Roush. The song tells the story of a new naval era dawning - right in Virginia’s Hampton Roads.   On March 8, 1862, the ironclad CSS Virginia—often called the Merrimac [or Merrimack] because it was constructed upon that wooden ship’s salvaged hull—attacked a Hampton Roads blockade to restore maritime access to Richmond and Norfolk.  With its armor deflecting Union shots, the Virginia sank the USS Cumberland and forced the surrender of the USS Congress.  When the Union’s ironclad ship, the USS Monitor, arrived the next day to defend the blockade, the historic “Battle of the Ironclads” ensued.  Though no clear winner prevailed in that battle, the emergence of the Civil War ironclads forever changed naval warfare.  One hundred and fifty years later, the Hampton Roads area maintains its relevance as a hub for trade, shipbuilding, military bases, and, of course, history.  Thanks to Tom Roush for permission to use this week’s music and to Heather Vereb for writing this week’s script.

For other water sounds and music, and for more Virginia water information, visit our Web site at virginiawaterradio.org, or call us at (540) 231-5463.  From the Virginia Water Resources Research Center in Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water.

SHOW NOTES 
Acknowledgments and Sources: The origin of the tune and lyrics of “The Cumberland and Merrimac” are anonymous.  This version of the song was arranged and performed by Tom Roush, used with permission.  The full performance of the song by Mr. Roush is available on You Tube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l__6mnRk1_w.  More information about Mr. Roush’s music is available online at http://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/tom-roush/id450240401 or http://www.hickorygrovecemetery.com/Tom%20Roush.htm.

The first two installments in Virginia Water Radio’s series of songs about Virginia waterways in the Revolutionary and Civil Wars were Episode 101 (Week of 3-5-12) and Episode 103 (week of 3-19-12).

Information on the Battle of Hampton Roads, the formal name for the February 1862 engagement between ironclads, was taken from the Naval History and Heritage Command’s “CSS Virginia” Web site at http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/sh-us-cs/csa-sh/csash-sz/virginia.htm (3/20/12).


Recent Virginia Water News
            For news relevant to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Virginia Water Central News Grouper, available online at http://vawatercentralnewsgrouper.wordpress.com/.

Water Meetings and Other Events
            For events related to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Quick Guide to Virginia Water–related Conferences, Workshops, and Other Events, online at http://virginiawaterevents.wordpress.com/.  The site includes a list of Virginia government policy and regulatory meetings occurring in the coming week.

Monday, March 19, 2012

Episode 103 (March 19, 2012): History on the York River--"The Surrender of Cornwallis" by Bobby Horton


Please see below (after the transcript and show notes) for links to news and upcoming events.

TRANSCRIPT


From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of March 19, 2012.

This week we feature another song in the theme of the role of rivers in the American Revolutionary and Civil Wars.  Have a listen for about a minute.

MUSIC.

You’ve been listening to part of “The Surrender of Cornwallis,” performed by Bobby Horton on the 2008 album “Homespun Songs of the Patriots in the American Revolution.”  Established on the York River in 1691, Yorktown was an important Virginia port by the time of the Revolutionary War.  In 1781, Lord Charles Cornwallis led Great Britain’s southern army to Yorktown to establish a protected harbor for the British fleet.  When George Washington learned that a French fleet was sailing towards the Chesapeake Bay, American and French forces marched from New York to Virginia in order to trap Cornwallis’ army.  The resulting siege of Yorktown—aided by the French blockade of the lower Bay after the September 5 naval battle on the Bay between Virginia’s Cape Henry and Cape Charles—led to Cornwallis’ surrender on October 19.  That surrender helped end the war, but the battle severely damaged Yorktown, which never regained its former prominence as a port.  Thanks to Bobby Horton for permission to use this week’s music.

For other water sounds and music, and for more Virginia water information, visit our Web site at virginiawaterradio.org, or call us at (540) 231-5463.  From the Virginia Water Resources Research Center in Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water.

SHOW NOTES 
Acknowledgments: “Homespun Songs of the Patriots in the American Revolution” and its version of “The Surrender of Cornwallis” are copyright by Bobby Horton, used with permission.  More information about Mr. Horton is available online at http://bobbyhorton.com/.  The first installment in this series on music about rivers in the Revolutionary and Civil Wars was Episode 101 (Week of 3-5-12).

Sources: Information on Yorktown and its role in the Revolutionary War, and on the Battle of the Capes, was taken from the National Park Service’s “Colonial National Historical Park-Yorktown Battlefield” Web site at http://www.nps.gov/yonb/index.htm (3/19/12).


Recent Virginia Water News
            For news relevant to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Virginia Water Central News Grouper, available online at http://vawatercentralnewsgrouper.wordpress.com/.

Water Meetings and Other Events
            For events related to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Quick Guide to Virginia Water–related Conferences, Workshops, and Other Events, online at http://virginiawaterevents.wordpress.com/.  The site includes a list of Virginia government policy and regulatory meetings occurring in the coming week.

Monday, March 12, 2012

Episode 102 (March 12, 2012): Tornado Preparedness

Audio, transcript, and notes for this episode were removed 3-9-15; the information is available in Episode 256, 3-9-15.

Monday, March 5, 2012

Episode 101 (March 5, 2012): "All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight" by Bobby Horton



Please see below (after the transcript and show notes) for links to news and upcoming events.

TRANSCRIPT

From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of March 5, 2012.

This week, in honor of the recently celebrated Presidents Day, we present the first of several episodes featuring songs that recall the role of rivers in the American Revolutionary and Civil Wars.  Have a listen for about 45 seconds.

MUSIC.

You’ve been listening to part of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight,” performed by Bobby Horton on the 1985 album “Homespun Songs of the C.S.A., Vol. 1.”  The lyrics are from Ethel Lynn Beers’ poem “The Picket Guard,” published by Harper’s Magazine in November 1861.  As a key border between the Union and the Confederacy, the Potomac River was a focal point of the Civil War.  But many other waterways also were important in battles, strategy, industry, and movement of troops and supplies.  Control of the Mississippi River, for example, was a major objective of the war.  Many Virginia waterways were significant to the conflict, including the Rapidan River, the Rappahannock River, the Shenandoah River, and of course the James River, site of the Confederate capital at Richmond.  Thanks to Bobby Horton for permission to use this week’s music.

For other water sounds and music, and for more Virginia water information, visit our Web site at virginiawaterradio.org, or call us at (540) 231-5463.  From the Virginia Water Resources Research Center in Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water.

SHOW NOTES 
Acknowledgments: “Homespun Songs of the C.S.A., Vol. 1” and its version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac” are copyright by Bobby Horton, used with permission.  More information about Mr. Horton is available online at http://bobbyhorton.com/.

Sources: Information on “All Quiet Along the Potomac” and Ethel Beers was taken from http://womenshistory.about.com/library/bio/blbio_beers_ethel_lynn.htm and from Britannica Encyclopedia Online at www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/58438/Ethel-Lynn-Beers.  Information on rivers in the Civil War was taken from The History Place Web site at http://www.historyplace.com/civilwar/; the USA Civil War Web site at http://usa-civil-war.com/CW_Rivers/rivers.html; and the National Park Service’s Web site on the First Battle of Manassas, at www.nps.gov/mana/index.htm.


Recent Virginia Water News
            For news relevant to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Virginia Water Central News Grouper, available online at http://vawatercentralnewsgrouper.wordpress.com/.


Water Meetings and Other Events
            For events related to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Quick Guide to Virginia Water–related Conferences, Workshops, and Other Events, online at http://virginiawaterevents.wordpress.com/.  The site includes a list of Virginia government policy and regulatory meetings occurring in the coming week.