Friday, February 17, 2017

Episode 356 (2-20-17): Polar Plunges for Special Olympics


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (3:15)

Transcript of audio, notes on the audio, photos, and additional information follow below.

All Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 2-17-17.


TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO


From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of February 20, 2017.

This week, we feature another series of mystery sounds. Have a listen for about 35 seconds, and see if you can guess what’s going on with this music, screams, and water splashing. And here’s a hint: When a good cause needs help, lots of people plunge right in.

SOUND - ~39 sec

If you guessed, excited people running into near-freezing water, you’re right! But the real mystery is: why did over 200 people jump into the cold New River one day in January 2011? They were Radford, Va., participants in the Polar Plunge®, held annually to raise money for Special Olympics, the international organization dedicated to sports for people with intellectual disabilities. At winter water plunges around Virginia and across the country, the charity gets contributions from entry fees and from donations raised by plunging participants.

The 2017 plunges in Virginia were scheduled for February 4 into the Atlantic Ocean at Virginia Beach; February 18, into the New River at Radford; February 25, into the Potomac River in Prince William County; also February 25, into an above-ground pool in Richmond; and March 11, into a pool in Charlottesville. Information about these events is available online at polarplunge.com.

If you’ve got thick skin, plus a warm heart for a good cause, you could be heading for a plunge!

SOUND – ~5 sec

Thanks to this week’s co-host, Eryn Turney, the spring 2017 intern at the Virginia Water Resources Research Center.

SHIP’S BELL

For more Virginia water sounds, music, and information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call us at (540) 231-5463. Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment. Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close the show. In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water.

AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The sounds in this episode were recorded by Virginia Water Radio at the Special Olympics Polar Plunge into the New River at Bisset Park in Radford, Va., on January 29, 2011.

Click here if you’d like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.

This episode is an update of Episode 96 (1-23-12), which has been archived.

PHOTO
Special Olympics Virginia Polar Plunge in Richmond in 2016.  Photo by Willow Lawn (a Richmond commercial area operated by Federal Realty Investment Trust), courtesy of Nicole Rappaport, Virginia Special Olympics, used with permission.

For photos from the Virginia Beach Polar Plunge on February 4, 2017, please see this WTKR TV-Norfolk link.

EXTRA FACTS ABOUT POLAR PLUNGES AND SPECIAL OLYMPICS

The year 2017 marks the 25th anniversary of Virginia Special Olympics polar plunges. The funds raise help the Virginia organization provide training, competition, leadership, and health services to over 27,000 athletes.

Special Olympics International estimates that 200 million people worldwide have intellectual disabilities.

Sources: Virginia Special Olympics Polar Plunge Web site, http://polarplunge.com/; Special Olympics, “What We Do,” online at http://www.specialolympics.org/Sections/What_We_Do/What_We_Do.aspx.

SOURCES USED IN AUDIO AND FOR MORE INFORMATION

Keith Hagarty, “Highlander Polar Plunge Makes a Big Splash for Special Olympics,” Radford University News Release, 1/29/11, online at http://www.radford.edu/content/radfordcore/home/news/releases/2011/01/polar-plunge-2011.html.

Special Olympics, online at http://www.specialolympics.org/.

Special Olympics in Virginia, online at http://www.specialolympicsva.org/.

Virginia Special Olympics Polar Plunge, online at http://polarplunge.com/.

RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES

All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).

For another episode on a winter-time plunge into the New River, focusing on the heat-absorbing properties of water, please see Episode 195 (1-6-14): Wading into the New Year, the New River, and Water Thermodynamics.

STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS

This episode may help with the following Virginia 2010 Science SOLs:

Grades K-6 Life Processes Theme
3.4 - behavioral and physiological adaptations.

Grades K-6 Matter Theme
6.5 – properties and characteristics of water.

Life Science Course
LS.9 - adaptations for particular ecosystems’ biotic and abiotic factors, including characteristics of land, marine, and freshwater environments.

Physical Science Course
PS.7 – temperature, heat, and thermal energy transfer, including phase changes, melting point, etc.

Physics Course
PH.7 – energy transfer, transformations, and capacity to do work.

The episode may also help with the following Virginia 2008 Social Studies SOLs:

Virginia Studies Course
VS.10 – knowledge of government, geography, and economics in present-day Virginia.

World Geography Course
WG.3 - how regional landscapes reflect the physical environment and the cultural characteristics of their inhabitants.

The episode may also help with the following Virginia 2015 Social Studies SOLs, which become effective in the 2017-18 school year:

Virginia Studies Course
VS.10 – knowledge of government, geography, and economics in present-day Virginia.

World Geography Course
WG.3 - how regional landscapes reflect the physical environment and the cultural characteristics of their inhabitants.

Virginia’s SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/.

Monday, February 13, 2017

Episode 355 (2-13-17): Abraham Lincoln’s Roots along Waters of the Shenandoah Valley


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (3:58)

Transcript of audio, notes on the audio, photos, and additional information follow below.

All Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 2-10-17.


TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO


From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of February 13, 2017.

MUSIC – ~ 13 sec

This week, in honor of Abraham Lincoln’s birthday on February 12, music by a Harrisonburg, Va.-based band sets the stage for exploring the Shenandoah Valley roots of our 16th president. Have a listen for about 45 seconds.

MUSIC - ~44 sec

You’ve been listening to part of “Valley,” by The Steel Wheels, from the 2010 album, “Red Wing.” With the band’s home base in Harrisonburg and surrounding Rockingham County, the mountains, waters, and valley mentioned in the song could refer to the Blue Ridge Mountains, Shenandoah River, and Shenandoah Valley.   If Abraham Lincoln’s great-grandfather John or great-grandmother Rebecca had been musicians, they, too might have been inspired by those Virginia land and water features.   In 1768 the John Lincoln family left Pennsylvania and settled along Linville Creek, a tributary of the North Fork Shenandoah River in what was then part of Augusta County, Va., from which Rockingham County was formed in 1778.  In the 1780s, President Lincoln’s grandfather, also Abraham, joined thousands of other Virginians migrating to what was then Virginia’s Kentucky County.  That area became the state of Kentucky in 1792 and, in 1809, the birthplace of the future president.  Five generations of Lincolns are buried at the Rockingham County homestead’s cemetery, where every year—rain or shine—a ceremony is held to remember the most famous descendant of the 17th and 18th Century settlers and migrants along western Virginia’s ridges, rivers, and valleys.

Thanks to The Steel Wheels for permission to use this week’s music, and we close with a few more seconds of “Valley.”

MUSIC - ~ 15 sec

SHIP’S BELL

For more Virginia water sounds, music, and information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call us at (540) 231-5463. Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water.

AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

“Valley,” from the 2010 album “Red Wing,” is copyright by The Steel Wheels, used with permission.  More information about The Steel Wheels is available online at http://www.thesteelwheels.com/.

PHOTOS
Three scenes from the Shenandoah Valley and the Shenandoah/Potomac watershed, moving downstream.  Top - North Fork Shenandoah River at Timberville, Va. (Rockingham County). Feb. 26, 2007, downstream of Linville Creek, the river’s tributary on which the Lincoln homestead is located. Middle – Meems Bottom Covered Bridge over the North Fork Shenandoah River near Mt. Jackson, Va. (Shenandoah County), Oct. 13, 2012.  Bottom: Confluence of the Shenandoah River (foreground) with the Potomac River (background) at Harpers Ferry, W.Va., Aug. 14, 2008.

SOURCES USED IN AUDIO AND FOR MORE INFORMATION

David Hackett Fischer and James C. Kelly, Bound Away: Virginia and the Westward Movement, University of Virginia Press, Charlottesville, 2000.  According to these authors (p. 137), about a million people migrated out of Virginia in late 1700s to mid-1800s; (and from p. 155): “...a human deluge poured down the western rivers and along the Wilderness Road” into Kentucky in the 1780s and 1790s.

Foundation for On-Line Genealogy’s WeRelate Web site, “Early Settlers on Linville's Creek, Augusta County, VA,” online at http://www.werelate.org/wiki/Early_Settlers_on_Linville's_Creek,_Augusta_County,_VA.  According to this source: “Linville Creek was one of the most interesting and important centers of Colonial Virginia. In the lush Shenandoah Valley of Virginia in Augusta (later Rockingham) County, it quickly became a civilized outpost. It had a history before the Swiss Germans joined the English, Quakers, and few Scotch-Irish who were among the earliest settlers.”

Heritage Museum of the Harrisonburg/Rockingham County Historical Society, “President Lincoln’s Rockingham Roots,” online at http://www.heritagecenter.com/Web_Pages/Museum/Collection/Lincoln/Lincoln.html.

MapTech Inc., “Linville Creek Watershed Implementation Plan: A Plan to Reduce Bacteria and Sediment in the Linville Creek Watershed,”` prepared for the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, April 2014, online (as PDF) at http://www.deq.virginia.gov/Portals/0/DEQ/Water/TMDL/ImplementationPlans/linvilepublic.pdf.

Carl Sandburg, Abraham Lincoln (one-volume edition), Harcourt Brace Johanovich, New York, 1974 (see particularly pp. 1-7, “Wilderness Beginnings”).

Freddie L. Spradlin, VaGenWeb.org, “Counties and Cities,” online at http://vagenweb.org/county2.htm.

Virginia Department of Historic Resources, “Historic Registers/Rockingham County (Northern),” online at http://www.dhr.virginia.gov/registers/Counties/register_Rockingham.htm.  This Web site links to a PDF of the 1972 nomination form for the Lincoln Homestead to be on the National Register of Historic Places; the form includes a description of the property.

Virginia Tourism Corporation, “Lincoln Homestead and Cemetery,” online at https://www.virginia.org/listings/HistoricSites/LincolnHomesteadCemetery/.

RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES

All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html). See particularly the History subject category.

A previous episode on Abraham Lincoln and Virginia waters is the following:
Episode 201, 2-17-14: Abraham Lincoln and the James River.

Previous episodes on the Shenandoah River, its valley, or its tributaries include the following:
Episode 130, 10/1/12 – on the Shenandoah River and valley;
Episode 209, 4/14/14 – on the Blue Ridge and its connection to the James, Rappahannock, and Shenandoah/Potomac watersheds;
Episode 288, 11/2/15 – on mountain gaps in general, and specifically Fridley Gap in Massanutten Mountain, which separates the North and South Forks of Shenandoah River;
Episode 331, 8/29/16 – on Passage Creek and Fort Valley.

STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS

The episode may help with Virginia 2013 Music SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.”

This episode may also help with the following Virginia 2010 Science SOLs:

Grades K-6 Earth Resources Theme
4.9 - Va. natural resources, including watersheds, water resources, and organisms.

Grades K-6 Living Systems Theme
6.7 - natural processes and human interactions that affect watershed systems; Va. watersheds, water bodies, and wetlands; and water monitoring.

Earth Science Course
ES.8 - influences by geologic processes and the activities of humans on freshwater resources, including identification of groundwater and major watershed systems in Virginia.

The episode may also help with the following Virginia 2008 Social Studies SOLs:

Virginia Studies Course
VS.10 – knowledge of government, geography, and economics in present-day Virginia.

World Geography Course
WG.6 - past and present trends in human migration and cultural interaction as influenced by social, economic, political, and environmental factors.

Virginia and United States History Course
VUS.6 – major events of 1788 to 1860.

The episode may also help with the following Virginia 2015 Social Studies SOLs, which become effective in the 2017-18 school year:

Virginia Studies Course
VS.1 – impact of geographic features on people, places, and events in Virginia history.
VS.10 – knowledge of government, geography, and economics in present-day Virginia.

United States History to 1865 Course
USI.8 – westward expansion and reform in American from 1801—1861.

World Geography Course
WG.15 – past and present trends in migration and cultural diffusion, including effects of environmental factors.

Virginia and United States History Course
VUS.6 – Major events in first half of 1800s.

Virginia’s SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/.

Monday, February 6, 2017

Episode 354 (2-6-17): Virginia’s Plants in History, Music, and Water


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:13)

Transcript of audio, notes on the audio, photos, and additional information follow below.

All Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 2-3-17.


TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO

From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of February 6, 2017.  This week’s episode is an updated re-do of a show from January 2013.

SOUND AND MUSIC - ~ 8 sec

This week, we drop in on a Virginia community supper where, on a cold winter evening, instrumental music honoring the natural vegetation of colonial Virginia had supper-goers calling out the names of native Virginia plants!   Sound unbelievable?  Well, just have a listen for about 50 seconds.

MUSIC and VOICES - ~ 51 sec
You’ve been listening to part of “Fair Meadows and Goodly Tall Trees,” performed by Timothy Seaman and Ardie Boggs on the 2006 CD, “Jamestown: On the Edge of a Vast Continent,” from Pine Wind Music.   The title comes from a description of Virginia’s coastal landscape by an English colonist in 1607.  Along with the music were the names of 13 plants found in water or wetlands in today’s Virginia.  Those plants are a small sample of the hundreds of aquatic and wetland plants—and the over 3000 total plants—growing wild in the Commonwealth.

While Virginia’s well known for its human history, the state also has a rich natural history, due in large part to its colorful, diverse, and complex plant life.   That remarkable natural resource is documented in the 1600-page Flora of Virginia. Published in late 2012, the Flora is the first comprehensive listing and description of Virginia’s plants since 1762.  In 2017, plant lovers and students will have two more learning opportunities: a Flora of Virginia Mobile App is under development, and the Library of Virginia’s “Flora of Virginia” exhibition is being shown in eight Commonwealth localities between January and December.

Thanks to Blacksburg friends for lending their voices to this episode.  Thanks also to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week’s music, and we close with a few more seconds of “Fair Meadows and Goodly Tall Trees.”

MUSIC - ~ 12 sec

SHIP’S BELL

For more Virginia water sounds, music, and information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call us at (540) 231-5463.  Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech’s College of Natural Resources and Environment.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close the show.  In Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water.

AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

“Fair Meadows and Goodly Tall Trees” and “Jamestown: On the Edge of a Vast Continent” are copyright 2006 by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.

Plants mentioned in this episode (in the order mentioned), with scientific name in italics, are as follows:
Lizard’s-tail, Saururus cernuus;
Water Stargrass, Heteranthera dubia;
Sundew, Drosera (several species with this common name);
Wild Celery, Vallisneria americana;
Toad Rush, Juncus bufonius;
Spike Rush, Eleocharis (various species with this common name);
Water-willow, Justicia americana;
American Lotus, Nelumbo lutea;
Yellow Water Buttercup, Ranunculus flabellaris;
Sweetflag, Acorus calamus;
Sea Lavender, Limonium carolinianum;
Arrowhead, Sagittaria (several species with this common name);
Duckweed, Lemna (several species with this common name).

Thanks to Tom Wieboldt, retired associate curator of the herbarium in the Virginia Tech Department of Biological Sciences, for assistance with this episode in 2013.  Thanks to neighbors in Blacksburg, Virginia, for recording plant names on January 20 and 27, 2013.

This episode is an updated repeat of Episode 146, 1-28-13, which has been archived.

PHOTOS
Above: Wild Celery near Dixon Landing on the James River (Nelson-Buckingham county line), July 11, 2009.
Above: Lizard’s-tail at Caledon State Park (King George County), June 30, 2009.
Water Stargrass on the Potomac River at Whites Ferry, near Leesburg (Loudoun County), August 14, 2008.

EXTRA FACTS ABOUT THE “FLORA OF VIRGINIA” TRAVELING EXHIBITION

As of February 3, 2017, the following are the dates and locations scheduled in 2017 for the Library of Virginia’s “Flora of Virginia” traveling exhibition, according to the Flora of Virginia Web site at http://floraofvirginia.org/education/flora-panel-exhibit-itinerary/:

Jan. 9–Feb. 18 - Russell County Public Library, Lebanon;
Feb. 20–April 1 - City of Chesapeake Central Library;
April 3–May 13 - Jamerson Memorial Library, Appomattox;
May 15–June 24 - City of Lexington Public Library;
June 24–Aug. 5 - Ettrick-Matoaca Library, South Chesterfield;
Aug. 7–Sept. 16 - Historic Christ Church, Weems (Lancaster County)
Sept. 18–Oct. 28 - Central Rappahannock Regional Library (Fredericksburg)
Oct. 30–Dec. 9 - Eastern Shore Public Library (Accomac).

SOURCES

Used in Audio

Flora of Virginia Project, “Flora Exhibit Itinerary,” online at http://floraofvirginia.org/education/flora-panel-exhibit-itinerary/.  This link has information about the Library of Virginia’s traveling “Flora of Virginia” exhibition.

The Mariners Museum of Newport News, Va., “Colonial Period: Exploration of the Chesapeake Bay,” accessed online at http://www.marinersmuseum.org/sites/micro/cbhf/colonial/col007.html.  This is the source of information on the quote, “...fair meadows and goodly tall trees.”

Alan S. Weakley, J. Christopher Ludwig, and John F. Townsend, Flora of Virginia, Flora of Virginia Project, Inc., Richmond, Va. and the Botanical Research Institute of Texas Press, Fort Worth, Tex., 2012 (reprinted 2013).  More information is available online at http://floraofvirginia.org/. This approximately 1600-page book is considered the “first manual of [Virginia’s] plants since 1762’s Flora Virginica,” according to the project’s Web site.   It includes descriptions, identification information, and 1,400 illustrations about more than 3000 vascular plants—that is, plants with specific tissues for transporting water and dissolved substances (vascular plants include ferns and fern allies, gymnosperms, and angiosperms).  Key partners in development of the book were the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, the Virginia Botanical Association, the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden in Richmond, the Virginia Academy of Science, and the Virginia Native Plant Society.  For ordering information, please visit http://www.brit.org/brit-press/books/virginia, or contact the Flora of Virginia Project at P.O. Box 512, Richmond, VA 23218-0512; phone (804) 371-5561; e-mail: flora@floraofvirginia.org.

For More Information about Plants in Virginia
Mary Reid Barrow, Grow Wild Celery in your Home for the Bay, Virginian-Pilot, 1/16/13.

Peter W. Bergstrom et al., Underwater Grasses in Chesapeake Bay & Mid-Atlantic Coastal Waters: Guide to Identifying Submerged Aquatic Vegetation, University of Maryland Sea Grant Publications, College Park, Md., 2006, 76 pages; information available online at http://ww2.mdsg.umd.edu/store/books/sav/index.php.

Chesapeake Bay Program, “Bay Grasses,” online at http://www.chesapeakebay.net/issues/issue/bay_grasses.

Virginia Native Plant Society, online at http://vnps.org/; this organization provides information about native species and natural plant habitats.   Located at 400 Blandy Farm Lane, Unit #2, Boyce, VA 22620; (540) 837-1600.

VTree, the Web site for the dendrology course by Dr. John Seiler in Virginia Tech’s Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, offers identification keys and fact sheets to trees and other woody plants throughout North America.  The site is online at http://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/main.htm; at this site are also links to download the VTree Mobile App.

RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES

All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html). See the “Plants” subject category.

For other episodes on aquatic plants or wetlands in Virginia, please see the following:
Episode 169, 7/8/13 – on marshes and other wetlands;
Episode 269, 6/8/15 – on wetlands in the definition of “Waters of the United States” in the federal Clean Water Act;
Episode 186, 11/4/13 – on photosynthesis;
Episode 325, 7/18/16 – on Chesapeake Bay submerged aquatic vegetation (“Bay grasses”);
Episode 327, 8/1/16 – on wetlands generally.

STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS

The episode may help with Virginia 2013 Music SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.”

This episode may also help with the following Virginia 2010 Science SOLs:

Grades K-6 Earth Resources Theme
4.9 - Va. natural resources, including watersheds, water resources, and organisms.

Grades K-6 Life Processes Theme
4.4 – basic plant anatomy and processes.

Grades K-6 Living Systems Theme
6.7 - natural processes and human interactions that affect watershed systems; Va. watersheds, water bodies, and wetlands; and water monitoring.

Life Science Course
LS.4 - organisms’ classification based on features.

Earth Science Course
ES.6 – renewable vs. non-renewable resources (including energy resources).

Biology Course
BIO.8 - dynamic equilibria and interactions within populations, communities, and ecosystems; including nutrient cycling, succession, effects of natural events and human activities, and analysis of the flora, fauna, and microorganisms of Virginia ecosystems.

The episode may also help with the following Virginia 2008 Social Studies SOLs:

Virginia Studies Course
VS.3 – first permanent English settlement in America.

World Geography Course
WG.2 - how selected physical and ecological processes shape the Earth’s surface, including climate, weather, and how humans influence their environment and are influenced by it.
WG.7 - types and significance of natural, human, and capital resources.

The episode may also help with the following Virginia 2015 Social Studies SOLs, which become effective in the 2017-18 school year:

Virginia Studies Course
VS.3 – first permanent English settlement in America.
VS.9 – how national events affected Virginia and its citizens.

World Geography Course
WG.2 - how selected physical and ecological processes shape the Earth’s surface, including climate, weather, and how humans influence their environment and are influenced by it.
WG.4 - types and significance of natural, human, and capital resources.

Virginia’s SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/.