Monday, March 25, 2013

Episode 154 (3-25-13): Music of "Hills and Hollers" for the Virginia Wildlife Action Plan

Click to listen to episode (2:26).
 
Transcript of audio, acknowledgements, and other information follow below.

TRANSCRIPT

From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of March 25, 2013.

This week, we feature a song about land, water, wildlife, and home places, by an accomplished musician connected to the Charlottesville area. Have a listen for about for 30 seconds.

MUSIC.

You’ve been listening to part of a special Virginia version of “Hills and Hollers,” by Adrienne Young and Little Sadie. The original “Hills and Hollers” was on the 2005 album “The Art of Virtue” on the AddieBelle Music label. In 2007, Ms. Young and her group performed the Virginia version in a Department of Game and Inland Fisheries video about the Virginia Wildlife Action Plan. First approved in 2005, the Wildlife Action Plan is a 10-year strategy that identifies 925 species of greatest conservation need, the habitats that support these species, and the tasks needed to conserve the species and the habitats. In 2013, the department is beginning the plan’s first update, which is due to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 2015. For more information about the Virginia Wildlife Action Plan, and to see the Adrienne Young video, visit www.bewildvirginia.org. Thanks to the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries for permission to use this week’s music.

For other water sounds and music, and for more Virginia water information, visit our Web site at virginiawaterradio.org, or call us at (540) 231-5463. From the Virginia Water Resources Research Center in Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water.

AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This week’s music was taken from the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries’ (VDGIF) Virginia Wildlife Action Plan video, featuring Adrienne Young and Little Sadie, online at http://www.bewildvirginia.org/, used with permission of VDGIF.  Information on the Wildlife Action Plan was taken from the plan’s Web site, http://bewildvirginia.org/wildlifeplan/, and from the VDGIF coordinator for the plan, Chris Burkett, phone (804) 367-9717, e-mail: wildlifeplan@dgif.virginia.org.  More information about Adrienne Young is available at http://backyardrevolution.com/.  This music and information about the Virginia Wildlife Action plan were previously used in Virginia Water Radio episode 22 (week of 6-21-10), now archived.


IMAGE





The Virginia Wildlife Action plan uses six ecoregions to organize wildlife and habitats in the Commonwealth. Figure from Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, http://www.bewildvirginia.org/wildlifeplan/ecoregions.asp, accessed 3/25/13, used with permission.

Monday, March 18, 2013

Episode 153 (3-18-13): "Grandad Planted Trees," by Bob Gramann

Click to listen to episode (2:45).

Please see below (after the transcript and show notes) for links to news and upcoming events.


TRANSCRIPT


From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of March 18, 2013.

This week, we feature a musical selection about one of Virginia’s most common natural resources and one of the most important for the Commonwealth’s waters.  Have a listen for about 45 seconds.

MUSIC.
You’ve been listening to an excerpt from “Grandad Planted Trees” by Bob Gramann on his 2004 CD of the same name.  Fortunately for all of us, lots of people these days are like Grandad in the song and recognize the value of planting trees, especially for water benefits.  For example, plastic tubes beside streams indicate trees planted to help improve stream water quality and habitat.  Cities encourage tree-planting to help reduce stormwater runoff and the pollutants it can carry to waterways.  Airline travelers can contribute money to tree-planting projects as a way to try to help offset the carbon emissions of the flight.  In these and other ways, trees are recognized as part of the solution for an array of water-resources issues.  Virginia has a rich diversity of trees: deciduous and evergreen; flowering and cone-bearing; shrubby and towering.  These trees’ interactions with water are key factors in the health of each resource, and those interactions have impacts far beyond the forest.  Thanks to Bob Gramann for permission to use this week’s music.For other water sounds and music, and for more Virginia water information, visit our Web site at virginiawaterradio.org, or call us at (540) 231-5463.  From the Virginia Water Resources Research Center in Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water.

SHOW NOTES


Saplings planted along Toms Creek in Blacksburg (Montgomery County), Virginia, emerging from protective tubes, October 10, 2009.



Trees framing Little River near Radford, Virginia, September 22, 2009.


Acknowledgments and Sources: “Grandad Planted Trees” is copyright by Bob Gramann, used with permission.  Bob Gramann’s Web site is http://www.bobgramann.com/.

This episode’s script was adapted from the conclusion to “An Introduction to Trees in Virginia and Their Connections to Water,” by Sanglin Lee and Alan Raflo, posted 12/7/11 on the Virginia Water Central News Grouper, at http://vawatercentralnewsgrouper.wordpress.com/2011/12/07/an-introduction-to-trees-in-virginia-and-their-connections-to-water/, and published in Virginia Water Central, April 2012 (http://www.vwrrc.vt.edu/watercentral.html).  The article includes a list of some basic references on Virginia’s trees.  A Virginia Cooperative Extension version of this article (“Trees and Water,” by Sanglin Lee, Alan Raflo, and Jennifer Gagnon; some differences in text) is available online at http://pubs.ext.vt.edu/ANR/ANR-18/ANR-18NP_pdf.pdf.
 
For an online guide to identification of trees that occur in Virginia, see the tree Fact Sheets from the Virginia Tech Department of Forest Resources and Conservation, at http://dendro.cnre.vt.edu/dendrology/factsheets.cfm.

 
Recent Virginia Water News
            For news relevant to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Virginia Water Central News Grouper, available online at http://vawatercentralnewsgrouper.wordpress.com/.

Water Meetings and Other Events
            For events related to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Quick Guide to Virginia Water–related Conferences, Workshops, and Other Events, online at http://virginiawaterevents.wordpress.com/.  The site includes a list of Virginia government policy and regulatory meetings occurring in the coming week.

Monday, March 11, 2013

Episode 152 (3-11-13): Weather Balloons

Click to listen to episode (4:38).

Please see below (after the transcript and show notes) for links to news and upcoming events.


TRANSCRIPT

From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of March 11, 2013.

This week, we feature a series of mystery sounds.  Have a listen for about 20 seconds, and see if you know what time-tested measuring tool is being launched.  And here’s a hint, with apologies to Bob Dylan: the answer is blowing in the wind.

VOICE/SOUND.


If you guessed a weather balloon, you’re right!  Twice each day, over 90 National Weather Service locations launch weather balloons carrying an electronic sensor that transmits data on the upper atmosphere’s temperature, pressure, humidity, and winds.  The sounds you heard were from the 6 p.m. launch on February 28, 2013, at the Weather Service’s forecast office in Blacksburg.  To learn a bit more about weather balloons and their importance, have a listen to the following two-minute recording from that launch.

VOICE/SOUND


As Mr. Wilson noted [in the audio], despite the availability of radar, satellite photos, and other tools, meteorologists rely on measurements from balloon launches to make more accurate weather forecasts.  Along with skilled human judgments, this combination of simple and sophisticated tools helps us make sense of the complicated air and water masses constantly moving overhead.  Thanks to the National Weather Service office in Blacksburg for their help with this week’s episode.For other water sounds and music, and for more Virginia water information, visit our Web site at virginiawaterradio.org, or call us at (540) 231-5463.  From the Virginia Water Resources Research Center in Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water.

SHOW NOTES
 
















Balloon ready for launch (top) and launch site (bottom) at National Weather Service Forecast Office in Blacksburg, Virginia.  Photos courtesy of David Wert at that office, 3/11/13.

Acknowledgments:
Sounds in this episode were recorded during the February 28, 2013, 6 p.m. balloon launch by Meteorologist Intern Patrick Wilson at the Blacksburg, Virginia, National Weather Service forecast office.  Please click
this link to listen to the full recording (9 minutes/10 seconds) made during that launch.  Thanks to Patrick Wilson for allowing Virginia Water Radio to watch and record the launch and for his informative comments, and to David Wert, Meteorologist in Charge at the Blacksburg NWS office, for helping arrange the visit.

Sources for more information:
The video collection on the “Estuaries Education” Web site, provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. EPA, has a “Weather Balloons” video at http://estuaries.noaa.gov/Estuarylive/VideoGallery.aspx?ID=8.  The site also has “Weather Forecasting Technology” that discusses other forecasting tools (satellite photos, radar, ground observations, and computer models).

Please note that Tuesday, March 12, 2013, has been proclaimed by Gov. Robert McDonnell as Tornado Preparedness Day in Virginia.  At 9:45 a.m. on that day, a statewide tornado drill will allow schools, government agencies, businesses, and families to practice tornado-emergency plans.  Information on tornadoes, tornado preparedness, and the 2013 statewide tornado drill is available from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management’s (VDEM) Web page for tornadoes at http://www.vaemergency.gov/readyvirginia/stayinformed/tornadoes.  Other information on preparing for natural disasters and other potential emergencies is available at VDEM’s “Ready Virginia” Web page at http://www.vaemergency.gov/readyvirginia; that page includes a link to find the emergency manager for one’s particular locality.  Contact VDEM at (804) 897-6500 or pio@vdem.virginia.gov.



Recent Virginia Water News
            For news relevant to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Virginia Water Central News Grouper, available online at http://vawatercentralnewsgrouper.wordpress.com/.

Water Meetings and Other Events
            For events related to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Quick Guide to Virginia Water–related Conferences, Workshops, and Other Events, online at http://virginiawaterevents.wordpress.com/.  The site includes a list of Virginia government policy and regulatory meetings occurring in the coming week.

Monday, March 4, 2013

Episode 151 (3-4-13): Snakes

This episode has been replaced by Episode 465, 3-25-19.