Monday, April 30, 2012

Monday, April 16, 2012

Episode 107 (4-16-12): Disposing of Medications Properly

This episode was updated and replaced by Episode 417 (4-23-18).

Monday, April 9, 2012

Episode 106 (4-9-12): Getting the Weather Message


Please see below (after the transcript and show notes) for links to news and upcoming events.

TRANSCRIPT
From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of April 9, 2012.

This week we feature another mystery sound.  Have a listen for about 15 seconds, and see if you know what was happening during these sounds.  And here’s a hint: what tells you whether to act?

SOUNDS 1.

You’ve been listening to rain, thunder, and Virginia Tech emergency warning sirens during a tornado-warning for the Blacksburg area in the early morning of April 28, 2011.  While tornado sirens are not too common in Virginia, most Virginians frequently receive special weather-related messages through various electronic media.  Here are three samples from NOAA Weather Radio.

SOUNDS 2.

According to the National Weather Service, an advisory highlights weather conditions that may cause significant inconvenience or threaten life or property if caution is not used.  A watch means that conditions are right for a hazardous weather event to occur, but the location or timing is uncertain.  And a warning is issued when a hazardous event is actually occurring or is very likely to occur, and people should take appropriate safety action immediately.  Information on appropriate actions for specific weather events is available from the National Weather Service, the Virginia Department of Emergency Management, the American Red Cross, and other organizations.  Take some time now to get ready for the next severe-weather message.

For other water sounds and music, and for more Virginia water information, visit our Web site at virginiawaterradio.org, or call us at (540) 231-5463.  From the Virginia Water Resources Research Center in Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water.

SHOW NOTES 
Acknowledgments: Recordings of National Weather Service statements were taken from the “NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards Streaming Audio” Web page at http://www.nws.noaa.gov/nwr/streamaudio.htm#audio (Hagerstown and Manassas stations’ “Hazardous Weather Outlooks,” as of 11 a.m. on 4/9/12).

Sources: Information was taken from the National Weather Service online glossary, http://www.weather.gov/glossary/, 4/9/12.  Web sites for organizations mentioned are as follows (as of 4/9/12): National Weather Service, “Weather Safety” page at http://www.nws.noaa.gov/safety.php (this page includes information on NOAA Weather Radio); Virginia Department of Emergency Management “Ready Virginia” page at http://www.vaemergency.gov/readyvirginia; American Red Cross home page at http://www.redcross.org/ (click on “Preparing and Getting Trained”).


Recent Virginia Water News
            For news relevant to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Virginia Water Central News Grouper, available online at http://vawatercentralnewsgrouper.wordpress.com/.

Water Meetings and Other Events
            For events related to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Quick Guide to Virginia Water–related Conferences, Workshops, and Other Events, online at http://virginiawaterevents.wordpress.com/.  The site includes a list of Virginia government policy and regulatory meetings occurring in the coming week.

Monday, April 2, 2012

Episode 105 (4-2-12): Spring Peepers


Please see below (after the transcript and show notes) for links to news and upcoming events.

TRANSCRIPT

From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of April 2, 2012. 

This week, we feature another mystery sound.  Have a listen for about 20 seconds, and see if you recognize these calls and chorus, which you may have heard on spring evenings in areas near standing water.

SOUND.

If you guessed: Spring Peepers—you’re right!  These frogs’ mating calls are produced by the males when air in a throat pouch is drawn across the voice box.  Like other frogs, toads, and salamanders, Spring Peepers are amphibians and rely on water for reproduction.  Snowmelt and spring rain provide ephemeral – or temporary – ponds and pools where many amphibians’ eggs transform into tadpoles and eventually into land-dwelling adults.  For Spring Peepers in Virginia, this metamorphosis takes about 90 to 100 days.  As temperatures drop through fall and into winter, peepers enter a type of hibernation, during which parts of their bodies may temporarily form ice crystals and freeze!  In spring, as ephemeral waters thaw or reappear, the cycle begins again.  Though you may not see these tiny, one-inch frogs, their mating calls are prevalent across the Commonwealth, reminding us of the complex and crucial role of our Virginia waters.  Thanks to Heather Vereb for writing this week’s script.

For other water sounds and music, and for more Virginia water information, visit our Web site at virginiawaterradio.org, or call us at (540) 231-5463.  From the Virginia Water Resources Research Center in Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water.

SHOW NOTES 
Sources: Information on Spring Peppers was taken from the Rhode Island Vernal Pools Web site at http://www.uri.edu/cels/nrs/paton/LH_spring_peeper.html (3/28/12), the Maryland Department of Natural Resources Web site at http://www.dnr.state.md.us/features/spring_peepers.asp (3/30/12), and the Virginia Herpetological Society Web site at http://www.virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/ (3/30/12).


Recent Virginia Water News
            For news relevant to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Virginia Water Central News Grouper, available online at http://vawatercentralnewsgrouper.wordpress.com/.

Water Meetings and Other Events
            For events related to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Quick Guide to Virginia Water–related Conferences, Workshops, and Other Events, online at http://virginiawaterevents.wordpress.com/.  The site includes a list of Virginia government policy and regulatory meetings occurring in the coming week.