Monday, November 28, 2011

Episode 90 (November 28, 2011): Tundra Swan

Click to listen to episode (2:18).

Please see below (after the transcript and show notes) for links to news and upcoming events.

TRANSCRIPT


From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 28, 2011.

This week we feature another mystery sound.  Have a listen for about 20 seconds and see if you can guess what kind of winter Virginia visitor is making these calls.  And here’s a hint: the name might suggest looking graceful in a very cold place.

SOUND.

If you guessed Tundra Swans, you’re right!  Tundra Swans, formerly called Whistling Swans, breed in the Arctic but winter along the Atlantic, Pacific, and Gulf coasts.  In Virginia, the birds are found between November and March around the Chesapeake Bay, on the Eastern Shore, and in Back Bay in Virginia Beach.  Tundra Swans are one of three swan species potentially found in Virginia.  Non-native Mute Swans live year-round on park land and golf courses but also in natural habitats, where their aggressive behavior can displace Tundra Swans and other native birds.  And Trumpeter Swans historically migrated through Virginia, but by the 1900s commercial harvests, habitat loss, and pollution had removed this species from most eastern U.S. areas.  Decades of conservation efforts, however, are helping restore Trumpeter Swan populations.  Thanks to Lang Elliott of NatureSound Studio and to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for permission to use this week’s recordings.

For other water sounds and music, and for more Virginia water information, visit our Web site at virginiawaterradio.org, or call us at (540) 231-5463.  From the Virginia Water Resources Research Center in Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water.

SHOW NOTES: 
Acknowledgments: The sounds of individual Tundra Swan calls (first set of sounds) were taken from “Tundra Swan” on the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott and NatureSound Studio (online at http://www.naturesound.com/); the sound of a Tundra Swan flock was taken from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Sound Clips Web site at http://www.fws.gov/video/sound.htm, and from The Fish and Wildlife Service recording was previously included in Virginia Water Radio Episode 20 (week of June 7, 2010).

Sources:  Information about Tundra Swans and other swans was taken from Life in the Chesapeake Bay-3rd Edition, by Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006), pp. 161-162; A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, by Chandler S. Robbins et al. (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2001); the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries’ (DGIF) Fish and Wildlife Information Service Web site at (http://vafwis.org/fwis/?Title=VaFWIS+Species+Information; the DGIF’s “Tundra Swan Trax” Web page at http://www.dgif.virginia.gov/wildlife/swan/descriptions.asp; Cornell University Lab of Ornithology’s “All About Birds” Web site at http://www.allaboutbirds.org; and the Cornell Ornithology Lab’s “Birds of North America Online” Web site at http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna (subscription needed for this Web site).

Recent Virginia Water News
            For news relevant to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Virginia Water Central News Grouper, available online at http://vawatercentralnewsgrouper.wordpress.com/.

Water Meetings and Other Events
            For events related to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Quick Guide to Virginia Water–related Conferences, Workshops, and Other Events, online at http://virginiawaterevents.wordpress.com/.  The site includes a list of Virginia government policy and regulatory meetings occurring in the coming week.

Monday, November 21, 2011

Episode 89 (November 21, 2011): "Rappahannock Rapids" by Morey A. Stanton

Click to listen to episode (2:29).

Please see below (after the transcript and show notes) for links to news and upcoming events.

TRANSCRIPT
 
From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 21, 2011. 

This week we feature a delightful banjo tune inspired by one of Virginia’s major rivers.  Have a listen for about 45 seconds. 

MUSIC. 

You’ve been listening to part of “Rappahannock Rapids,” written by Morey A. Stanton.  After many years of visits to Rappahannock River Campground in the Culpeper County town of Richardsville, Mr. Stanton wrote the tune for the staff at the campground, who now feature it on their Web site.  The headwaters of the Rappahannock River, and of its major tributaries the Hazel and Rapidan rivers, begin at the Blue Ridge in Fauquier, Rappahannock, Madison, and Greene counties.  The Rappahannock ends at its confluence with the Chesapeake Bay, where the river separates Lancaster County on the Northern Neck from Middlesex County on the Middle Peninsula.  The river’s approximately 184-mile length is rich with natural beauty and aquatic habitats, local and national history, and of course, rapids!  Thanks to Rappahannock River Campground for permission to use this week’s music. 

For other water sounds and music, and for more Virginia water information, visit our Web site at virginiawaterradio.org, or call us at (540) 231-5463.  From the Virginia Water Resources Research Center in Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. 

SHOW NOTES

“Rappahannock Rapids,” composed by Morey A. Stanton, was located in 2010 on the Web site of Rappahannock River Campground at 33017 River Road in Richardsville, Va. (Culpeper County), now online at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Rappahannock-River-Campground/310182049066914; used with permission granted at that time by owners of that business.  This week’s information and music were previously included in Virginia Water Radio Episode 24 (week of July 12, 2010). 


Sources: Information on the Rappahannock River was taken from the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries Web site at www.dgif.virginia.gov/fishing/waterbodies/display.asp?id=170, 11/21/11.  For a musical selection on the removal of Embrey Dam from the Rappahannock River at Fredericksburg, please see Virginia Water Radio Episode 71 (week of 7-11-11). 

Recent Virginia Water News 

For news relevant to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Virginia Water Central News Grouper, available online at http://vawatercentralnewsgrouper.wordpress.com/.

Water Meetings and Other Events 


For events related to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Quick Guide to Virginia Water–related Conferences, Workshops, and Other Events, online at http://virginiawaterevents.wordpress.com/. The site includes a list of Virginia government policy and regulatory meetings occurring in the coming week.
 


Monday, November 14, 2011

Episode 88 (November 14, 2011): Loons

Click to listen to episode (2:05).

Please see below (after the transcript and show notes) for links to news and upcoming events.


TRANSCRIPT

From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 14, 2011.

This week we feature another mystery sound.  Have a listen for about 20 seconds, and see if you can identify what’s making the various high-pitched calls, which may sound like a yodel, hoot, or wail.

SOUND.


If you guessed a loon, you’re right!  The distinctive calls of loons are associated with lakes and other water bodies in Canada and the northern United States, where five species of loons breed.  But Virginia’s coastal areas provide winter homes for two species, the Common Loon and Red-Throated Loon.  Unfortunately for Virginians, however, these birds [typically] do not make their calls in winter.  Loons are known for their swimming and diving abilities, and they typically go on land only during breeding.  The Common Loon, as its name implies, is well-known as a symbol of wildlife and wilderness, and the species has been extensively studied as an indicator of water quality, including particularly the effects of mercury and acid rain.  Thanks to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and to Lang Elliott of NatureSound Studio for this week’s sounds.

For other water sounds and music, and for more Virginia water information, visit our Web site at virginiawaterradio.org, or call us at (540) 231-5463.  From the Virginia Water Resources Research Center in Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water.

SHOW NOTES

Acknowledgments:
The loon sounds were taken from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Sound Clips Web site at http://www.fws.gov/video/sound.htm, and from “Common Loon” on the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott and NatureSound Studio (online at http://www.naturesound.com/).   The Fish and Wildlife Service loon recording was previously included in Virginia Water Radio Episode 32 (week of September 6, 2010).

Sources:
Information on loons was taken from A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, by Chandler S. Robbins et al., St. Martin’s Press, 2001 edition; from the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries’ Fish and Wildlife Information Service Web site at http://vafwis.org/fwis/?Title=VaFWIS+Species+Information; from Cornell University Lab of Ornithology’s “All About Birds” Web site at http://www.allaboutbirds.org; and from the Cornell Ornithology Lab’s “Birds of North America Online” Web site at http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna (subscription needed for this Web site).

Added note 1/8/15: For more on the two loon species (Common and Red-throated) that winter Chesapeake Bay area, see “Chesapeake’s winter visitors include a couple of loons,’ by Kathy Reshetiloff, in the December 2014 issue of Bay Journal, available online at http://www.bayjournal.com/article/chesapeakes_winter_visitors_include_a_couple_of_loons.


Recent Virginia Water News
For news relevant to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Virginia Water Central News Grouper, available online at http://vawatercentralnewsgrouper.wordpress.com/.

Monday, November 7, 2011

Episode 87 (November 7, 2011): "Falls of Richmond" by Timothy Seaman

Click to listen to episode (2:26).

Please see below (after the transcript and show notes) for links to news and upcoming events.

TRANSCRIPT

From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 7, 2011.

This week we feature a musical selection that celebrates a whitewater jewel in the middle of Virginia’s capital city.  Have a listen for about 40 seconds.

You’ve been listening to “Falls of Richmond,” performed by Timothy Seaman on his 2004 CD, “Virginia Wildlife,” from Pine Wind Music.  The falls of Richmond are the series of scenic and dramatic rapids marking the Fall Line in the James River, where the river flows out of the Piedmont and into the Coastal Plain.  While providing today’s Richmond with natural habitat, scenery, and challenging whitewater paddling, the falls area also has many historical connections to the city’s role in transportation, industry, and the Civil War.  The James River Park System, started from an initial land donation in 1972, now includes 550 acres of shoreline and islands throughout most of Richmond’s Fall Line area, creating what the Friends of James River Park call a “watery and woodsy gem of a public park.”  Thanks to Timothy Seaman for permission to use this week’s music.

For other water sounds and music, and for more Virginia water information, visit our Web site at virginiawaterradio.org, or call us at (540) 231-5463.  From the Virginia Water Resources Research Center in Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water.

SHOW NOTES  
Acknowledgments: Music on the CD “Virginia Wildlife” is copyright 2004 by Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  “Falls of Richmond” was also featured in the sound segment of Virginia Water Radio Episode 62 (week of 4-18-11).

Sources: Information about the James River falls at Richmond was taken from the James River Association’s James River Water Trail Map (Middle Section, Map 6); and the Web site of the James River Park System, at www.jamesriverpark.org/index.php (source of quote is http://www.jamesriverpark.org/visit-the-park/about-the-park.php).  The “Virginia Wildlife” CD was a collaboration between Mr. Seaman and the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries; for more information, visit https://www3.dgif.virginia.gov/estore/proddetail.asp?prod=VW219.

 
Recent Virginia Water News

For news relevant to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Virginia Water Central News Grouper, available online at http://vawatercentralnewsgrouper.wordpress.com/.

Water Meetings and Other Events

For events related to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Quick Guide to Virginia Water–related Conferences, Workshops, and Other Events, online at http://virginiawaterevents.wordpress.com/. The site includes a list of Virginia government policy and regulatory meetings occurring in the coming week.