Monday, November 26, 2012

Episode 138 (11-26-12): Snow Geese


Please see below (after the transcript and show notes) for links to news and upcoming events.

TRANSCRIPT
From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 26, 2012.

This week we feature another mystery sound.  Have listen for about 15 seconds, and see if you can guess what’s making this riot of sound.  And here’s a hint: Snow or no, the Chesapeake Bay area entertains these feathered visitors every winter.

SOUND.

If you guessed Snow Geese, you’re right!  After breeding in the Arctic in summer, Snow Geese return to the Chesapeake Bay region for late fall and winter.  Gathering to feed on plants around water bodies and in wetlands and agricultural fields, Snow Geese flocks can number in the thousands.  The species has two color forms: a white morph that’s common in the Bay region, and a blue morph that’s more common west of the Mississippi River.  From 1916 to 1975, Snow Goose hunting in the eastern United States was banned due to low population levels of the birds, but in recent decades populations have increased greatly.  And these big gangs of geese are a sight to behold: According to one description, from Cornell University, seeing “huge flocks of Snow Geese swirl down from the sky...is a little like standing in a snow globe.”  Thanks to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for making this week’s sound available for public use. 

For other water sounds and music, and for more Virginia water information, visit our Web site at virginiawaterradio.org, or call us at (540) 231-5463.  From the Virginia Water Resources Research Center in Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water.


SHOW NOTES

Snow Geese in flight.  Photo made available for public use the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov, accessed 11-26-12.


Acknowledgments:
The quote in the script is from the Snow Goose introduction on the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology’s “Bird Guide” Web site at http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/search.  The Snow Geese sound was taken from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s “Sound Clips” Web site (public domain sounds) at http://www.fws.gov/video/sound.htm, accessed 11/26/12.  This week’s script was based in part on work done by Minni Gupta, a 2011 Virginia Tech graduate who did an internship with the Virginia Water Resources Research Center in the fall 2010 semester.  Ms. Gupta wrote Virginia Water Episode 38 (week of 10-18-10), which also includes Snow Geese sounds and information.

Sources: Information on Snow Geese (Chen caerulescens) was taken from Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries’ “Fish and Wildlife Information Service” Web page at http://vafwis.org/fwis/?Title=VaFWIS+Species+Information+By+Name&vUT=Visitor; the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology’s “Bird Guide” Web site at http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/search; Life in the Chesapeake Bay, by Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006); and A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, by Chandler S. Robbins et al. (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2001).

Other sources of information on Virginia birds include the following:
*Virginia Society of Ornithology at www.virginiabirds.net;

*Cornell University Lab of Ornithology’s “Birds of North America Online” at http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna (a subscription is required).

*E-bird Web site at http://ebird.org/content/ebird/, maintained by the Cornell Lab and the Audubon Society.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations.

Recent Virginia Water News
            For news relevant to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Virginia Water Central News Grouper, available online at http://vawatercentralnewsgrouper.wordpress.com/.

Water Meetings and Other Events
            For events related to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Quick Guide to Virginia Water–related Conferences, Workshops, and Other Events, online at http://virginiawaterevents.wordpress.com/.  The site includes a list of Virginia government policy and regulatory meetings occurring in the coming week.



Monday, November 19, 2012

Episode 137 (11-19-12): Wild Turkey and Water


This episode has been replaced by a revised repeat, Episode 343, 11-21-16.

Monday, November 12, 2012

Episode 136 (11-12-12): Ducks at the Dance


Please see below (after the transcript and show notes) for links to news and upcoming events.

TRANSCRIPT

From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 12, 2012.

This week, we drop in on a rich Virginia cultural tradition—a Saturday-night square dance—where calls of “Duck for the oyster!” got dancers talking about a key part of Virginia’s rich aquatic-wildlife tradition!  Sound unlikely?  Well, just have a listen for about 50 seconds. 

MUSIC AND VOICES.

You’ve been listening to Blacksburg-based string band The Jugbusters playing at a recent community dance, while several dancers called out some of the duck species found in Virginia.  About 25 kinds of ducks occur regularly or occasionally on the Commonwealth’s ponds, streams, wetlands, and coastal waters.  They include dabblers, like Mallards, which feed from the water surface; divers, like mergansers, which submerge below the surface to feed; and sea ducks, like the Bufflehead, which spend part of their life over marine areas.  Some ducks can be found year-round in Virginia, but most species are winter residents, migrating to spring breeding grounds in Alaska, other northwestern states, Canada, or Greenland.  Whenever they land in the Old Dominion, ducks are as Virginian as an old-time string band.  Thanks to The Jugbusters and our duck-name callers for permission to use this week’s music and sounds.

For other water sounds and music, and for more Virginia water information, visit our Web site at virginiawaterradio.org, or call us at (540) 231-5463.  From the Virginia Water Resources Research Center in Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water.

SHOW NOTES


Black Ducks.  Photo made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov, accessed 11-12-12.


Acknowledgments:
Music in this episode was performed by Blacksburg, Virginia band The Jugbusters during a November 10, 2012, dance in Blacksburg, and the names of ducks were spoken by people attending that dance; all used with permission.  More information about The Jugbusters is available at their Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/thejugbusters.

Sources:
Information on ducks was taken from the “Wildlife Information” Web page of the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, at http://www.dgif.virginia.gov/wildlife/, which includes the March 2010 “Official List of Native and Naturalized Fauna of Virginia”; this database provides maps and detailed accounts of the range and present distribution of each species in the database (as of 11/12/12); the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Web site “Waterfowl ID,” online at http://www.flyways.us/duck-identification-resources (as of 11/12/12); Life in the Chesapeake Bay, by Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006; and A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, by Chandler S. Robbins et al. (New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2001).

Other sources of information on Virginia ducks include the following:
*Virginia Society of Ornithology at www.virginiabirds.net; or

*Cornell University Lab of Ornithology’s “Bird Guide” Web site at http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/search, and the Cornell lab’s “Birds of North America Online” at http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna.  Both Cornell sites include photos, distribution maps, recordings of calls, and ecological information on birds throughout the Western Hemisphere; a subscription is required to use the “Birds of North America Online” site.

*E-bird Web site at http://ebird.org/content/ebird/, maintained by the Cornell Lab and the Audubon Society.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations.

Recent Virginia Water News
            For news relevant to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Virginia Water Central News Grouper, available online at http://vawatercentralnewsgrouper.wordpress.com/.

Water Meetings and Other Events
            For events related to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Quick Guide to Virginia Water–related Conferences, Workshops, and Other Events, online at http://virginiawaterevents.wordpress.com/.  The site includes a list of Virginia government policy and regulatory meetings occurring in the coming week.

Monday, November 5, 2012

Episode 135 (11-5-12): "Hail to the Chief"--Virginia-born Presidents and Water


Please see below (after the transcript and show notes) for links to news and upcoming events.

TRANSCRIPT
From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of November 5, 2012.

This week, we feature famous music and a history mystery.  Have a listen for about 40 seconds, and see if you can guess how this well-known tune connects Virginia and water.

MUSIC

You’ve been listening to “Hail to the Chief,” played by the U.S. Army Band.  Since 1815 this tune has been used to honor U.S. presidents and announce their arrival.  Virginia is the birthplace of eight presidents, and bodies of water influenced the careers or administrations of each, as the following examples show.

George Washington made his home on the Potomac River and led famous Revolutionary War battles near the Hudson, Delaware, and York rivers;

Third president Thomas Jefferson used the young U.S. Navy to confront shipping challenges by Great Britain, France, and pirates.

Fourth president James Madison led the nation into war with Britain in 1812 over obstruction of shipping and capture of sailors.

Fifth president James Monroe stretched the country’s sphere of influence from the Atlantic to the Pacific by declaring in 1823 that the United States would tolerate no further European colonization in the Western Hemisphere.

Ninth president William Henry Harrison gained fame in the 1811 battle against Indian chieftain Tecumseh on the Tippecanoe River in the Indiana Territory.

Tenth president John Tyler’s administration negotiated the Webster-Ashburton treaty with Britain that established the international border through four of the Great Lakes and protected open navigation on those lakes;

Twelfth president Zachary Taylor’s administration negotiated the Clayton-Bulwer treaty with Britain that guaranteed access to for both countries to a contemplated canal across Central America between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans;

And 28th president Woodrow Wilson ordered several military and diplomatic actions in the Caribbean Sea, and he led the nation into its first war across the Atlantic Ocean, partially over actions by German submarines.

Like these Virginia presidents, whichever candidate is elected on November 6, 2012, will face serious challenges.  But they can be thankful they won’t be expected to match one famous Virginia president-and-water feat: George Washington’s legendary silver-dollar toss across the Rappahannock River!

For other water sounds and music, and for more Virginia water information, visit our Web site at virginiawaterradio.org, or call us at (540) 231-5463.  From the Virginia Water Resources Research Center in Blacksburg, I’m Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water.

SHOW NOTES 


Potomac River, as viewed from the grounds of Mt. Vernon, January 10, 2005.

Acknowledgments: The version of “Hail to the Chief” used in this episode was by the U.S. Army Band “Pershing’s Own,” accessed at their Web site at http://www.usarmyband.com/audio/ceremonial_music_guide.html, 11/5/12. 

Sources: Information on “Hail to the Chief” is available from Library of Congress’ Performing Arts Encyclopedia’ s “Hail to the Chief” article, online at http://lcweb2.loc.gov/diglib/ihas/loc.natlib.ihas.200000009/default.html; C-Span’s 5/16/99 video, “Origin of ‘Hail to the Chief,’” online at http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/123402-1; and the U.S. Marine Band’s “Hail to the Chief” article, online at http://www.marineband.usmc.mil/learning_tools/library_and_archives/resources_and_references/hail_to_the_chief.htm.

Information on water connections to presidents from Virginia was taken from the following (all accessed 11/5/12):
●Web site of The White House, at http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents (Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, and William Henry Harrison);
●Library of Congress’ Web site, “America’s Story from America’s Library,” at http://www.americaslibrary.gov/aa/presidents.php (James Monroe);
●Public Broadcasting System (PBS) WGBH/American Experience/Biography Web site, at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/biography/ (John Tyler);
●University of Virginia Miller Center’s “American Presidents: A Reference Resource,” online at http://millercenter.org/president (Zachary Taylor and Woodrow Wilson).

For a previous Virginia Water Radio episode focusing on the legend of George Washington throwing a silver dollar across the Rappahannock River, please see



Recent Virginia Water News
            For news relevant to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Virginia Water Central News Grouper, available online at http://vawatercentralnewsgrouper.wordpress.com/.

Water Meetings and Other Events
            For events related to Virginia's water resources, please visit the Quick Guide to Virginia Water–related Conferences, Workshops, and Other Events, online at http://virginiawaterevents.wordpress.com/.  The site includes a list of Virginia government policy and regulatory meetings occurring in the coming week.